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1970 Orange Challenger 340

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  • 1970 Orange Challenger 340

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    Last edited by Daniel; 11-26-2019, 09:22 AM.
    Due to the recent budget cuts,
    the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil, plus the
    current state of the economy, the light at the end
    of the tunnel has been turned off.

  • #2
    A sweet, sweet ride... Couldn't pass this one up when I found it...

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    • #3
      I like this one.
      Excellent pictures Daniel.
      Thanks for sharing.

      Cheers. Cobra

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      • #4
        Nice pics but delete the "R/T". No R/T here. It's a Challenger T/A. Limited edition 340 6-barrel, produced in spring 1970. The Plymouth version was the AAR Cuda.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Leroy Brown View Post
          Nice pics but delete the "R/T". No R/T here. It's a Challenger T/A. Limited edition 340 6-barrel, produced in spring 1970. The Plymouth version was the AAR Cuda.
          So what does the T/A stand for Tyrant Anus?
          Due to the recent budget cuts,
          the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil, plus the
          current state of the economy, the light at the end
          of the tunnel has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #6
            I like that color......and those pics are stunning.....
            Scotty "Mustang (+Matchbox) Mad Man!"

            RIP.....Pop.....David Blase Garascia 9-17-35 12-3-20.

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            • #7
              T/A is Trans Am. In order to qualify for the Trans Am racing series, manufacturers had to build a certain number of cars to their spec. This car and the AAR Cuda were a one-time production run to meet those standards. Our dealership had a yellow Cuda and it lingered on the lot until late summer, kinda a "peg-warmer".

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              • #8
                The SCCA Trans-Am rules called for an engine of no more than 5 liters displacement. I don't know in what body Chrysler homologated such an engine, but it sure wasn't the Challenger! The 318 is 5.2 liters, and the next smaller engine they offered at the time was (OK, I'm no authority on this!) the 225 Slant-6. (Please correct me if I'm wrong on this). GM built the Camaro Z/28 with it's famous DZ302 engine for just this reason, but the Pontiac Trans Am came from the factory with a 400. Meanwhile, Ford homologated it's big block V-8 for it's NASCAR Torinos and Montegos by selling it in Mustangs!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CorvairJim View Post
                  The SCCA Trans-Am rules called for an engine of no more than 5 liters displacement. I don't know in what body Chrysler homologated such an engine, but it sure wasn't the Challenger! The 318 is 5.2 liters, and the next smaller engine they offered at the time was (OK, I'm no authority on this!) the 225 Slant-6. (Please correct me if I'm wrong on this). GM built the Camaro Z/28 with it's famous DZ302 engine for just this reason, but the Pontiac Trans Am came from the factory with a 400. Meanwhile, Ford homologated it's big block V-8 for it's NASCAR Torinos and Montegos by selling it in Mustangs!
                  For the 1970 season the homologation rules for Trans-Am were changed to allow manufactures to destroke a larger engine, that's how the '70 AAR and T/A got away with 340s and the Z/28 got away with a 350, either way they were destroked down to ~302 CI. Pontiac had a 303 race engine, AMC had a 304, but those were also destroked versions of their normal engines.

                  For '69 and earlier the engines had to be homologated at the displacement they were intended to be ran at in competition.

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