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Nylint (NY-LINT) Grader-Loader Model 3000 (pressed steel)

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  • Nylint (NY-LINT) Grader-Loader Model 3000 (pressed steel)

    Stumbled across this (almost literally) yesterday. It was on the floor in the basement of a local shop. Complete and presentable. The only Nylint in the collection. Just couldn't pass it up. Saw the Nylint history on the Wiki, and may have had one or two Ford trucks as a lad (1960s). Let me know if you can pinpoint the era of this example. Not sure when they started using these plastic tires, but they may provide some clue. Liking the text on the inverted triangular decal at the front.











    - Jeff
    Supreme Miniature Vehicle Storage Solutions Architect

  • #2
    I would date that in the first half of the 1970s, not definitive, but that is where I would lean.
    The image file limits have been reset. We have over-limit warnings for the past 3 months and I've had to lower the image file limits. Upper limits now are 100,000 when we have some images that exceed 5,000,000. I know I've mentioned many times before, but it is very important to downsize images - doesn't matter if they are hosted elsewhere or here. I've set the pixels for no more than 1000 across the longest side, so if you resize to that all should be well. (The new limits are larger than what I typically use, and my images turn out just fine, so I know it shouldn't be a problem)

    Thank you for your understanding.

    Comment


    • #3
      Very nice! I just don't know how a loader would work on the business end of a grader. But, I guess loader coupled with grader means a lot of play value for the kiddos. I was born towards the late end of Tonka; my Mighty Dumper was one of the last USA models they offered. My others were all made when Hasbro sold the toolings to Funrise, to be made in China.


      From an old site, I used when I was into pressed steel; 1958-1962. Plastic tires and no remote release (on the side of the operator's station) means it appears to be a V2, '61-62.

      http://www.tnttoytrucks.com/NYCONGrdLdr1.html

      I have a Hough HM "Payloader", but it has rubber tires. Back during the time where I got really interested in pressed steel, only to find them and the size of my room don't mix. In the space this one loader takes (currently, its main job is a bookend); I can fit an entire 3" subcollection of a dozen or so models.

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      • #4
        Thanks. Nice web page with good photos. Mine has the hollow plastic tires, and is apparently missing the black rubber handle for the bucket height adjustment. Cool stuff. Yeah, I like pressed steel, but space is always an issue with that scale. I have two Tonka dump trucks, one Tonka road grader, and two old Tonka VW beetles. Would like to add more, but can't easily justify it. Stamp collecting might be the way to go.
        - Jeff
        Supreme Miniature Vehicle Storage Solutions Architect

        Comment


        • #5
          This next pressed steel model was actually on the edge of the radar screen for a number of years. Yes, another NY-LINT! Enjoyed taking a few initial photos before it started pouring. After these were taken, spent some time detailing it, but it was already in good nick (you'll agree?). According to the previously mentioned website, this example appears to be the second incarnation of this wonderful toy, which places it somewhere between 1957 - 1961. It has solid rubber tires, and the decals and rigging are in good condition. Compared to online photos of other examples, the outrigger feet seemed to be upside-down (see first three outside photos), so later corrected them (last photo).









          Last edited by atombaum; 10-05-2019, 02:15 AM.
          - Jeff
          Supreme Miniature Vehicle Storage Solutions Architect

          Comment


          • #6
            That's one I may just very well get. I love its realistic rigging, steering, and working outriggers. Something the '70s Tonka I've got doesn't do. I just am beginning to wonder that if I find one cheap without the rigging or clamshell (and quite frankly, I don't really need the latter), how hard do you think it would be to re-rig the lines?

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            • #7
              The bucket cord would be a straight line from the hand wheel take-up spool out to the bucket, where it is tied off, so that should be pretty easy, but that cord is a flatter material (like a miniature "shoe lace" for lack of a better description). Not sure if it absolutely has to be the same or not. Also don't know if mine is original, but it came from the estate of the original owner.

              Someone on eBay is selling the rigging cord. It appears to be the round cord. Here is the link to the eBay page: https://tinyurl.com/yy8thkec The vendor provides rigging instructions. Maybe contact them and ask if the bucket line is supposed to be the same as the boom line. Let me know what you find out if you do.

              And the boom rigging goes from the other hand wheel take-up spool, up and around the pulley, and back down to the inside of the body where (I assume) it is tied off with a knot.

              Let me know if you need more pictures.
              - Jeff
              Supreme Miniature Vehicle Storage Solutions Architect

              Comment


              • #8
                Here are a few more shots of the differences between the boom cord and the bucket cord. Again, the bucket cord is flat and wider, like a shoe lace, and it's the one that goes straight up the center. The boom cord is round, like what the eBay ad has. The boom cord terminates inside the body (see photo) with a knot (as expected). Hope this helps in your quest.







                A few bonus shots for reference...



















                Last edited by atombaum; 10-06-2019, 11:33 AM.
                - Jeff
                Supreme Miniature Vehicle Storage Solutions Architect

                Comment


                • #9
                  CODY6268: I contacted the eBay vendor about the rigging cord and he was unsure if the flatter "shoe lace" style cord was original for the bucket rigging. He said "mint in box" (MIB) examples come up about once a year, so try to see what they have.
                  - Jeff
                  Supreme Miniature Vehicle Storage Solutions Architect

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I had a number of the pressed steel toys when I was much younger - still have some of them and will share pictures down the road. While the majoriety of them were from Tonka I had some other brands and know I had the Ny-lint Michigan Shovel Truck as part of my fleet. I do not recall seeing it buried anyplace in the basement with my other pressed steel toys but it is possible it is tucked away in a box I haven't gotten to yet. We are currently doing some major sorting/cleaning/downsizing and may be looking for new homes for some of those old pressed steel toys.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi John,

                      These have so much character, it's hard to say no. Like going to the animal shelter I suppose. Found some shelf space in the basement for these recent large-scale acquirements. Sneaking this next one in under the radar. Let's call it a "heavy truck and equipment support vehicle."

                      In any event, learned that the blue version of the Jeep Gladiator originally came as a set, which included a horse trailer, and a couple of horses. The more common, red version appears to have been sold separately, and is the one I usually see at shows, shops, and flea markets. Also, as mentioned further up the page, the scale of these makes it a challenge to store and/or display.

                      Not actively seeking more, but if I crossed paths with an older (1950s/1960s) piece in good, complete shape, that I don't have, I would probably give it a forever home.

                      So far have two Tonka dump trucks, a Tonka road grader, the two Nylints shown in this topic. Oh, and two VW beetles (black), and now this Jeep Gladiator.

                      The Party Continues...








                      - Jeff
                      Supreme Miniature Vehicle Storage Solutions Architect

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cody6268 View Post
                        From an old site, I used when I was into pressed steel; 1958-1962. Plastic tires and no remote release (on the side of the operator's station) means it appears to be a V2, '61-62.

                        http://www.tnttoytrucks.com/NYCONGrdLdr1.html
                        That's a great website. Thanks for sharing. So nice that someone has maintained it since the original owners passing.
                        Michael "Toyotageek"
                        Japanese Minicar Garage https://japaneseminicargarage.weebly.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by atombaum View Post
                          Hi John,

                          These have so much character, it's hard to say no. Like going to the animal shelter I suppose. Found some shelf space in the basement for these recent large-scale acquirements. Sneaking this next one in under the radar. Let's call it a "heavy truck and equipment support vehicle."

                          In any event, learned that the blue version of the Jeep Gladiator originally came as a set, which included a horse trailer, and a couple of horses. The more common, red version appears to have been sold separately, and is the one I usually see at shows, shops, and flea markets. Also, as mentioned further up the page, the scale of these makes it a challenge to store and/or display.

                          Not actively seeking more, but if I crossed paths with an older (1950s/1960s) piece in good, complete shape, that I don't have, I would probably give it a forever home.

                          So far have two Tonka dump trucks, a Tonka road grader, the two Nylints shown in this topic. Oh, and two VW beetles (black), and now this Jeep Gladiator.

                          The Party Continues...







                          Cookin' with Crisco here! Those were my favorite old Tonkas, the Gladiator Jeeps and variants. I recall a dump truck and cement mixer with this cab as well, might have been others. It helped I liked to watch Daktari, and they drove a zebra striped Gladiator on that show. That Jeep was one of the first vehicles I learned to identify as a kid.
                          The image file limits have been reset. We have over-limit warnings for the past 3 months and I've had to lower the image file limits. Upper limits now are 100,000 when we have some images that exceed 5,000,000. I know I've mentioned many times before, but it is very important to downsize images - doesn't matter if they are hosted elsewhere or here. I've set the pixels for no more than 1000 across the longest side, so if you resize to that all should be well. (The new limits are larger than what I typically use, and my images turn out just fine, so I know it shouldn't be a problem)

                          Thank you for your understanding.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I watched Daktari too, but didn't remember it had a Gladiator. Will go back and look. Zebra stripes would be perfect for a daily driver.

                            I was googling "Jeep Gladiator" and found the modern version (who knew?), but to my eyes, it looked the same as other Jeep models. Too bad it's not a retro design honoring this distinct model. It was a great looking truck.
                            - Jeff
                            Supreme Miniature Vehicle Storage Solutions Architect

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by atombaum View Post
                              I watched Daktari too, but didn't remember it had a Gladiator. Will go back and look. Zebra stripes would be perfect for a daily driver.

                              I was googling "Jeep Gladiator" and found the modern version (who knew?), but to my eyes, it looked the same as other Jeep models. Too bad it's not a retro design honoring this distinct model. It was a great looking truck.
                              Wow, no wonder I can't find that many of the blue, seeing as it was a set truck. I'll have to get that whole set since it has a horse trailer. My great-uncle had a J-10 in that same color, which I almost ended up with (and wanted badly, despite the welded frame, replaced engine, and RUST); which despite me being given the truck by my Granddad and my great-uncle's brother-in-law, was sold by my Granddad's greedy sister.

                              I honestly don't know why they didn't just call that new thing a "Scrambler"; seeing as how basically, the LWB Wrangler is more or less a modernized CJ-8 (there is also the industrial/military J-8) with our without a bed; while the Gladiator and J-series was more of a half-ton/three-quarter-ton pickup. I'd have liked it a lot better if they'd stuck with the concept (and the MBX model; when it came out, it was exactly how I thought the 1/1 would be); which was a single cab, long bed. In my opinion, why buy the pickup with such a short bed?


                              Personally, I don't see a need for a Jeep Truck today. When the Scrambler, J-Series, and Gladiator were produced; neither Kaiser nor AMC had a real pickup. After Chrysler bought them, they had the Ram; thus they really don't need a pickup. A truck with a good 4WD system can haul more; over the same terrain as a Jeep. We used to haul close to a ton of firewood in an '84 Dodge Power Ram 350 we had, over rough, steep terrain. The '98 Ram 1500 we have has been off-road as well, just not in the past 10-15 years or so. Often, when buying fence posts and the like, we take it right directly to where we're putting them in at.

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