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Hubley Real Toys 1960 Chevrolet Corvair

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  • Hubley Real Toys 1960 Chevrolet Corvair

    Click image for larger version  Name:	hubley chevy corvair red box6.JPG Views:	1 Size:	46.6 KB ID:	305939

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    After 60 years, one would expect small scale diecast to improve, and I think it is fair to say that overall it really has. The levels of detail in 1/64ish scale have improved substantially, especially in the past twenty years or so. Still, there is a lot of charm to be found in vintage models.

    Two of my personal favorite lines are the Lone Star Impys and associated lines, and the Burslem Real Types / Hubley Real Toys lines.

    Hubley was a significant player in the toy industry, particularly with toy vehicles, dating at least into the 1930s. As I recall they were big into cast iron in the beginning. Later they got into pressed steel and diecasting. Though most of their efforts were larger scale (they even had a series of model kits made of metal), they did acquire the line of Real Types from Burslem of Canada and then expanded on that line. The Corvair was unique to Hubley, it is not a Burslem original.

    From beginning to end, the Real Types to Real Toys series probably didn't last more than 5 years, but they made models contemporary to that time period, with 1958-60 model vehicles one would see on American and Canadian roads during that period.

    While early Impys had all the cool opening features, jeweled headlights and tilt steering suspension (that's a lot of detail for the size at the time!), the Real Types/Toys had accurate lines and were scaled accurately to one another...so they looked good beside each other, which is something that cannot be said about Impys. Real Types/Toys are a little big for 1/64, I would guess 1/60, but they are comparatively rare and have a devoted following that seems to keep values respectable. Overall decent quality and sturdy construction means that even played with examples generally hold up well.
    Last edited by jt3; 07-28-2021, 05:47 PM.
    The image file limits have been reset. Upper limits now are 100,000 when we have some images that exceed 5,000,000. I've set the pixels for no more than 1000 across the longest side, so if you resize to that all should be well. (The limits are larger than what I typically use, and my images turn out just fine, so I know it shouldn't be a problem)

    Thank you for your understanding.

  • #2
    Awesome Hubley Corvair. A unique and wonderful Hubley Real Toy casting.

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    • #3
      jt3 - One of these 1960 Corvair four doors was my second car as a high school senior. It had a dangerous but very warm gasoline heater.
      I need to find one of these 1/60 Hubley Real Toy Corvair four door models for a custom project to create a model of my metailic silver
      grey 1960 Corvair four door. Please let me know if you locate any sources.

      CarreraRSR

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      • #4
        I've gotten the vast majority of my Real Types and Real Toys from the 'bay. I put the search for Hubley Real Types and it usually defaults to pick up the Burslems as well. Since the Corvair is strictly Hubley, you could also search Hubley Real Toys.

        If you aren't fussy about scale, you might also look at Lone Star, they also make an old 4 door Corvair, though I like the front detail better on the Hubley.

        Click image for larger version  Name:	lone star tootsietoy corvair red.JPG Views:	0 Size:	45.1 KB ID:	306073

        This is the Lone Star, 1/50 scale, and this example technically is Tootsietoy Classics, made in England. Tootsietoy contracted a handful of models from this era from Lone Star.

        Those are the only two (technically 3) moredoor Corvairs I am aware of.
        The image file limits have been reset. Upper limits now are 100,000 when we have some images that exceed 5,000,000. I've set the pixels for no more than 1000 across the longest side, so if you resize to that all should be well. (The limits are larger than what I typically use, and my images turn out just fine, so I know it shouldn't be a problem)

        Thank you for your understanding.

        Comment


        • #5
          Nice Corvair model!

          What charm these old toys have.

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          • #6
            I have yet to acquire any Hubley 1/64 models - they definitely had some good choices for everyday vehicles.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jt3 View Post

              Two of my personal favorite lines are the Lone Star Impys and associated lines, and the Burlem Real Types / Hubley Real Toys lines.

              .
              I feel the same, and I would add Siku V-series cars to this sweet company.
              Awsome cars

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              • #8
                You'd think modern diemaking, design, and protyping technology would give us better diecast. However, the toy grade pieces these days from a number of manufacturers seem a step below what they made in the 1960s. I've noticed many of my old Lesneys have crisp cast-in badges that can easily be read. Today, those details are usually pad/tampo printed, and what cast-in detail they have is usually a bit fuzzy, and made worse by thick paint jobs. Hard to believe most of the pieces in the 1960s were developed by hand drawings, hand-carved large-scale prototypes, which were then pantographed down into the diecasting mold and still hold up well nearly six decades later. There was no computer-aided design, 3D printing, computer-numerical control (CNC) milling machines, or heck, even a lot of the tool steels used in the molds today back then (which did not last as long as some of the harder, more wear-resistant steels of today). Large-scale automation to the degree modern factories are today didn't exist (and the molds often operated by hand--in fact, the current owners of Budgie had to modfiy the original tools as the hand-operated diecasting molds were against the British version of OSHA). But, they still looked great, and by the secondary market listings of these old pieces still being quite common, they were built to last.

                Hubley period can be expensive, and the Real Types/Real Toys models I've been wanting to add, but the prices keep me from it. At the present, I have just one large scale "Army Ambulance" from the 1950s, which I got from Pastor John here for a price I could afford.

                PS: I'm not an expert. I took mechatronics during a hiatus from my bachelor's 4 years ago (which mostly focused on industrial automation). I looked at taking machining in college, but ended up finishing my BS in Management and then moving on to accounting. My understanding of tool steels comes from the fact many of those steels are often used in the manufacture of pocket knives and the fact that I've read all kinds of spec sheets from the manufacturers. I also saw an old Lesney production video, but can't find it right now.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cody6268 View Post
                  I also saw an old Lesney production video, but can't find it right now.
                  Been almost two years since I gathered what I could from the old site and checked the links. Spot check of the first vid, Matchbox, opened up and started playing so at least that one is still good:

                  Factory videos - Diecast Garage
                  The image file limits have been reset. Upper limits now are 100,000 when we have some images that exceed 5,000,000. I've set the pixels for no more than 1000 across the longest side, so if you resize to that all should be well. (The limits are larger than what I typically use, and my images turn out just fine, so I know it shouldn't be a problem)

                  Thank you for your understanding.

                  Comment

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