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Meat wagon - What car is it?

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  • Meat wagon - What car is it?

    This model was amongst my first die cast purchased, when I arrived in the U. S. back in 1999.
    Johnny lightning was unknown to me and I was immediately hooked.
    ​​​​​​One thing I cannot remember is what car this actually is. I guess it's based on something real. But what?






  • #2
    '40 or '41 Packard ambulance/hearse, body by Henney

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    • #3
      Thanks Chris - you beat me to it - this is one I would love to have seen done as a stock ambulance/hearse.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by pjedsel View Post
        Thanks Chris - you beat me to it - this is one I would love to have seen done as a stock ambulance/hearse.
        I'd love to see a Packard or Cadillac hearse done in true 1/64 by Greenlight or Auto World in the near future. I'd happily pay the price of an RV or medium duty truck casting for one.

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        • #5
          Packard...good call Chris, beat me to it!
          The image file limits have been reset. We have over-limit warnings for the past 3 months and I've had to lower the image file limits. Upper limits now are 100,000 when we have some images that exceed 5,000,000. I know I've mentioned many times before, but it is very important to downsize images - doesn't matter if they are hosted elsewhere or here. I've set the pixels for no more than 1000 across the longest side, so if you resize to that all should be well. (The new limits are larger than what I typically use, and my images turn out just fine, so I know it shouldn't be a problem)

          Thank you for your understanding.

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          • #6
            We've seen the Ecto 1 retooled into stock ambulances, so why not the Meat Wagon? As it sits, it just confuses me. We need more pre-1950s ambulances in scale. Ertl did several on their panel castings--I have a 1948 Ford F-1 Panel Van the local rescue squad had done up as a promo.

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            • #7
              Thanks for the info! If JL still has the casting, a retooled version sure would be a fine idea.

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              • #8
                Well, the thing is it is based on an old 1960s (maybe earlier?) model kit.



                borrowed image

                I don't know that an actual vehicle exists. Whoever designed this kit may have purely invented it in his head. I am fairly confident it is not a Tom Daniel design, but I don't know who the designer is. Playing Mantis acquired the rights to many if not all Aurora model kits, but not the name, so Tom Lowe came up with "Polar Lights," and when JL was sold Tom retained Polar Lights, and Round 2 still has Polar Lights. Point being, some of the JL models from back when this came out were based on some of the more infamous Aurora model kits from the 1960s, and why you have this, Bugaboo, Surf Hearse, Carl Casper's Undertaker and others. Being the model has a serious top chop that runs the length of the model, it would probably be better to simply create a new tooling.

                I do agree, a Packard Hearse from this era would be cool to see in small scale. I think Hearses in general would be quite popular with collectors who might not otherwise want to own a real one. I think it would be hard to top a carved panel Hearse from this era, and I'm pretty sure Packard was the base those were built on.



                borrowed image
                The image file limits have been reset. We have over-limit warnings for the past 3 months and I've had to lower the image file limits. Upper limits now are 100,000 when we have some images that exceed 5,000,000. I know I've mentioned many times before, but it is very important to downsize images - doesn't matter if they are hosted elsewhere or here. I've set the pixels for no more than 1000 across the longest side, so if you resize to that all should be well. (The new limits are larger than what I typically use, and my images turn out just fine, so I know it shouldn't be a problem)

                Thank you for your understanding.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cool, thanks for the history lesson!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jt3 View Post
                    Well, the thing is it is based on an old 1960s (maybe earlier?) model kit.



                    borrowed image

                    I don't know that an actual vehicle exists. Whoever designed this kit may have purely invented it in his head. I am fairly confident it is not a Tom Daniel design, but I don't know who the designer is. Playing Mantis acquired the rights to many if not all Aurora model kits, but not the name, so Tom Lowe came up with "Polar Lights," and when JL was sold Tom retained Polar Lights, and Round 2 still has Polar Lights. Point being, some of the JL models from back when this came out were based on some of the more infamous Aurora model kits from the 1960s, and why you have this, Bugaboo, Surf Hearse, Carl Casper's Undertaker and others. Being the model has a serious top chop that runs the length of the model, it would probably be better to simply create a new tooling.

                    I do agree, a Packard Hearse from this era would be cool to see in small scale. I think Hearses in general would be quite popular with collectors who might not otherwise want to own a real one. I think it would be hard to top a carved panel Hearse from this era, and I'm pretty sure Packard was the base those were built on.




                    borrowed image
                    Agreed on the Meat Wagon and the 2 cents on hearse castings.

                    Cadillac, LaSalle, and Rolls-Royce were the other primary manufacturers of carved panel hearses. Mercedes-Benz, Daimler, Buick, and even Chrysler & Chevrolet carved hearses were known to exist. A friend converted a Galaxie Ltd. '46-'48 Chevy sedan delivery 1/25 kit into a John Little-bodied carved hearse via a Jimmy Flintstone resin body. I think he built it as a '46.

                    (R-R made them primarily for Latin America and other former Spanish, French, Italian or Portuguese colonies, who had a taste for fancy hearses, as well as for use in Asian countries, whose funeral directors often imported a rolling R-R chassis and had traditional Buddhist, Shinto or Confucian temple architecture added in with the typical carved panels by local artisans)

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